The Logistics Of 3-D Printing A Cow In Portland

A Meetup.com group of 3-D printer aficionados, the PDX 3D Printing Lab, in Portland, Oregon, spent several months planning and 3-D printing a life-size replica of a cow. Yes, a cow. The model is made of PLA (Polylactic acid) material, a regularly-used type of 3-D printing material, printed with 14 separate 3-D printers representing 700 hours of printing time.

The Logistics Of 3-D Printing A Cow In Portland

For the Love of All Things Good in This World, Stop Reposting This FB Status

It’s not the first time, nor will it be the last . . . another stupid Facebook hoax is making the rounds, prompting countless distant relatives and work acquaintances to fill your Timeline with totally inaccurate legal jargon. Per usual, the widely spread Facebook status regards a nonexistent change to the social network’s privacy policy. Something along the lines of “I do not give Facebook permission to use my profile pictures, statuses, or personal information” has likely graced your News Feed lately, but in case you’re unaware of the hoax in question, here are some examples.

“Better safe than sorry.”

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“Now it’s official! It is published in the media.”

Source: Reddit user ridinkidonk

 

“I’m very disappointed in you Jim” reflects our thoughts exactly. For the record, you’ll never have to repost a status to maintain the rights to your own information. As The New York Times succinctly put it, “In short: Your legal rights are determined not by any status you post, but by the social network’s Terms of Service, which all users agreed to upon creating an account.”

If you’re worried about the safety of your information, no Facebook status will change the state of your social media security. Instead, follow these tips to protect your privacy online – they’re actually effective. In the meantime, Facebook statuses . . .

For the Love of All Things Good in This World, Stop Reposting This FB Status